Healthy Spaghetti Squash Pad Thai

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I absolutely LOVE pad Thai- but when you order a takeout you’re not only getting all the carbs from the noodles but also all the bad fats from the cooking oils that they use. Here is a healthier version, replacing noodles with spaghetti squash (which I also love!) and cutting back on the unhealthy fat and calories- Enjoy!

SPAGHETTI SQUASH PAD THAI

Makes: 4 servings
Prep: 35 mins
Total Time: 1 hr 25 mins
Carb Grams Per Serving: 25

INGREDIENTS
1 small spaghetti squash (1.5 to 2 pounds)
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
1 1/2 tablespoons rice vinegar
1 1/2 tablespoons fish sauce
2 tablespoons sugar
1/2 jalapeno, minced
1 tablespoon water
1 tablespoon canola oil
3 cups thinly sliced green cabbage
1 14-ounce container extra-firm tofu, cut into 1/4-inch cubes
4 large eggs, whisked
1/2 cup peanuts, chopped
1/2 cup cilantro, chopped

DIRECTIONS

1. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees . Prick squash all over with a knife and roast on a rimmed baking sheet about 1 hour, or until tender when pierced.
2. Whisk together lime juice, vinegar, fish sauce, sugar, jalapeno and water in a small saucepan. Bring to a simmer; keep warm over low heat, whisking occasionally.
3. Heat oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat; add cabbage and saute 1 minute. Stir in tofu and cook, stirring occasionally, 3 minutes. Reduce heat to low and pour in eggs. Let sit 30 seconds, then stir constantly until eggs are just cooked, about 2 minutes more. Turn off heat.
4. Halve squash lengthwise and scoop out seeds. Using a fork, scrape squash from shell. Place strands in a large bowl and gently untangle with fork; transfer to skillet and fold into egg mixture. Drizzle with sauce, stirring to incorporate. Garnish with peanuts and cilantro.

Nutrition Information
Servings Per Recipe: 4
PER SERVING: 343 cal., 20 g total fat (4 g sat. fat), 707 mg sodium, 25 g carb. (5 g fiber), 20 g pro.

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5 Food Choices to Make You a Happier, Healthier Person

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In an age where more and more people are looking to take the easy way out when it comes to health and nutrition, poor eating decisions have led to serious health problems, because bad eating can kill you just as starvation can.

People are trading “shelf life” for freshness, “cheap” for nutritious, and “quantity” for quality without ever really knowing what they are putting in their body.

Here’s a list of 5 food choices that can change your life from Women’s Health Mag:

There is a solution to this very complex and far-reaching problem: you. By making small changes to your own diet, you can not only improve your health but also become part of the collective force needed to re-create a healthy food system that feeds the world well. Start here.

1. OCCUPY YOUR KITCHEN
By deciding how much and exactly which types of salt, sugar, and fat we will use to make our fruits, veggies, meat, dairy, and grains taste delicious, we reclaim control over our health and our weight. Cook as often as you can.

2. WHEN YOU BUY GLOBAL, THINK FAIR TRADE AND LOW IMPACT
Global certification programs like Fair Trade, Rainforest Alliance, and Marine Stewardship Council ensure that foods are grown sustainably. They also reduce the impact of chemically intensive growing practices.

3. USE WORD OF MOUTH
School gardens are cropping up, which is encouraging kids to ask for veggies at home. Millennials are teaching their parents the joys of kale and the tastiness of a veggie burger. The next time you host family or friends, serve them a grass-fed burger on a whole-grain bun along with a plateful of local vegetables. Let them see firsthand that eating in a way that changes the food system for the better can be delicious—and fun.

4. GROW SOMETHING EDIBLE
City dwellers can plant herbs in pots on a windowsill. Suburbanites can cultivate garlic and asparagus, a perennial vegetable that keeps producing for decades. Encourage your kids, neighbors, and friends to do the same. Odds are, you’ll feel more connected to your food and to your community (many food banks accept fresh produce donations from individuals and farmers’ markets).

5. REMOVE HIDDEN CORN FROM YOUR DIET
It goes well beyond high-fructose corn syrup—processed corn ingredients include dextrose, corn syrup solids, and corn-based sweeteners, as well as meat, milk, and dairy from corn-fed cattle. Nixing those products from your kitchen may encourage manufacturers to find healthier alternatives, and it’s also a great way to remove junk foods from your cabinets and make room in your wallet and home for natural, whole foods.